Delayed gratitude.

Today 10.01.2014:

I’m feeling: busy.

I’m listening to: A Charlie Brown Christmas.

I’m grateful for: my new Kindle, purchased exactly 1 month ago. The ability to read for pleasure again; while I love regular books, carrying them around only made my back & neck issues worsen. Paying off another debt in September. Filling out, and mailing off, the paperwork/application needed for my next highest professional license eligibility to take the professional exam for said licence. Health insurance. Having my oldest nephew not only come up to the U.S. for school, but living just a 5-10 minute drive away from me. Getting to see a friend of mine and her husband visiting from England (family wedding).

I’m creating: possibly another group at the job. A good future for myself, hopefully.

I’m enjoying: reading. How To Get Away With Murder. Being single – been single for a very long time, but enjoying it even more lately, as it allows me to focus on rebuilding my life without any male distractions.

I’m thinking about: the things that have come to fruition since that tarot reading. What’s next for me after getting the next highest professional license. My next steps in terms of handling business in England. How damn high plane ticket prices are to England. How damn high plane ticket prices are to visit my aunt in Kentucky. WTF do these airlines want, a mortgage payment? 😐

I’m reading: The Alchemist. Also just finished To Kill A Mockingbird a little over 1 week ago; read it as a youngster, but read it with wiser eyes this time around.

I’m looking forward to: the weekend.

I’m learning to/practicing to/working on/embracing: be grateful because even though things aren’t perfect, I can’t really complain now. Take things one small step at a time; sometimes that’s hard to remember. Remember that while seeing others doing well sometimes gets me down, their journeys aren’t mine – my day will come.

Around the house are: my exercise sneakers.

In my kitchen: a few new grocery items.

I’m planning later in the coming week to: continue checking flight prices to Kentucky and England. Follow up with a few questions about handling my business in England. Follow up with the doctor for another appointment. Continue working out. Cook – we’ve now delegated cooking for each person on certain days, and the weekend is now delegated to me to cook weekly. Check that my license paperwork/application made it to the state board offices. Research study guides for the licensing exam. Hopefully see my oldest nephew – you know teens don’t like hanging out with old folks, but damn it, he better see me this coming week. 😐

My quote/verse for the upcoming week is: Everyone has a story. http://www.dailyom.com/articles/2014/45272.html

I’m wishing you: a good week. Wholeness. Peace.

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Unsung heroine.

I learned about Mary Seacole about 9 months after moving here. She was the Black equivalent of America’s Florence Nightingale.

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October is Black History Month in the United Kingdom. I like it more here because it’s longer than in the United States (February – 28 days long, 29 days long every 4 years) and, in my area, there are lots of things going on during the month to celebrate, reflect & remember. For example, I had the honour of hearing Kofi Annan (Wikipedia link) speak earlier this month, and I’ll see another international figure of Black heritage speak later this month. But for now, I’d like to highlight a Black history figure who hasn’t received (well overdue) attention until recently, within the past few years.

I learned about Mary Seacole (Wikipedia link) about 9 months after moving here. An art gallery hosted an organisation, focused on raising funds to build a statue in her name, to talk about this little-known woman who made a big impact in Britain. She was the Black equivalent of Florence Nightingale.

I took photos of the painted portraits of Mary Seacole during the discussion, but unfortunately I can’t find them. If or when I do, I’ll add them to this post. In the meantime, check out Mary Seacole by going to the link below, expand your knowledge & learn you something. 😉

October is Black History Month – Mary Seacole

Consider donating to the Mary Seacole Memorial Statue fund.

Mary Seacole.
Mary Seacole.

Rock the vote.

Are you a U.S. expatriate who wants to vote in this year’s elections? If so, check out the following information sent to me about voting via absentee ballot.

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In transit.
In transit.

Are you a U.S. expatriate who wants to vote in this year’s elections? If so, check out the following information sent to me about voting via absentee ballot. For best accuracy, I’d suggest checking with your home state and your local embassy in your resident country for details, as it’s possible (I’m not sure, don’t wanna give out incorrect information) that different embassies in different countries have different instructions.
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Absentee ballots already delivered to overseas voters: Every U.S. citizen who requested an absentee ballot and selected the fax or email delivery option should have received it by now. Please cast your vote and take steps to return your completed ballot promptly so that your vote will count. See instructions below.

Returning your ballot by mail: Place your completed ballot in a U.S. postage-paid envelope containing the address of your local election officials. Place the completed ballot in a sealed envelope and take it to (my local embassy). We will send it back to the U.S. for you without the need to pay international postage. If it’s easier for you to use the (resident country) postal system, be sure to affix sufficient international postage, and allow adequate time for international mail delivery. If time is tight, you may want to use a private courier service (e.g., FedEx, UPS, or DHL) to meet your state’s ballot receipt deadline.

U.S. citizens can submit their completed ballots to the (resident country) Embassy’s Consular Section between the hours of (check yours locally), Monday through Friday, with the exception of (resident country) and U.S. holidays. No appointment is necessary. Please bring your ballot in a sealed envelope, and your U.S. passport. Your ballot will be sent to the United States via pouch, which takes approximately 10 working days.

Returning your ballot by email, fax, or upload: Some states allow these options, but may also require you to mail in the signed paper ballot. To find out more about your state’s specific requirements, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program website at www.FVAP.gov.

Haven’t received your ballot yet? Use the emergency write-in ballot: U.S. citizens who requested an absentee ballot but haven’t received it should go to www.FVAP.gov to complete a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot. Follow the above guidance for returning your ballot. If you later receive your regular absentee ballot, vote and return it immediately. Local election officials will count just one ballot per voter, and will use the regular ballot if received by your state’s ballot receipt deadline.

Forgot to register or request an absentee ballot? Act immediately! There are three options:

Option #1: Register and request a ballot today using the Federal Post Card Application form at www.FVAP.gov. Select the electronic ballot delivery option, include your email address (and fax number, if applicable) and send it to local election officials in your state. Almost every state lets you submit a ballot by email or fax. Once your application is processed they will send you your ballot via fax or email depending on your state. Vote as soon as you receive the blank ballot. Registration deadlines vary and some are as early as October 7, so check your state’s requirements carefully.

Option #2: Follow the instructions in Option #1, but also complete and send in a Federal Write-in Ballot at the same time to make sure your vote is counted. This option may be the best one for first-time voters if your state requires you to submit your Federal Post Card Application by mail. Vote and submit your regular absentee ballot if/when it arrives. Local election officials will count just one ballot per voter, and will use the regular ballot if it’s received by the ballot receipt deadline.

Option #3: Voters from the following states can use the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot as a combined voter registration form, absentee ballot request, and absentee ballot: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. (NOTE: This form must reach your local election officials by your state’s absentee ballot request deadline or voter registration deadline, whichever is first.)

Returning your Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot by mail: Follow the guidance above for returning your ballot by mail.

Returning your Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot by email or fax: The following states allow voters to email or fax their signed, voted Federal Write-in Absentee Ballots back to local election officials: Arizona, California (fax only), Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. (NOTE: see instructions at http://www.FVAP.gov for faxing or emailing your voted ballot.)

Confirm your registration and ballot delivery online: Learn more at the Federal Voting Assistance Program’s (FVAP) website at www.FVAP.gov.

Re-blog: No Loss Of Words.

Reading is one of my loves. No one should be deprived of the ability to read. Reading & literacy are fundamental. They can literally save lives. Check this out and vote.