Weekly Photo Challenge: Up.

(This is the 04.19.2013 challenge.  Whatever… better late than never.)

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Strata.
Strata.
Underground.
Underground.

04.17.2013 Upswing circus theatre performance.

Silks.
Silks.
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Change.

(This is the 04.12.2013 challenge.  Whatever… better late than never.) 

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

There are lots of changes going on around town.
There are lots of changes going on around town.
Change is good.
Change is good.
But on the flip side, how much will change cost?  And who will benefit?
But on the flip side, how much will change cost? And who will benefit?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Color.

(For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.)

04.10.2013 – Like me, he must’ve had a long day at work.  The work uniform signifies that he works in either construction, public transport, or engineering works.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: A Day in My Life.

(For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.)

I like this Weekly Photo Challenge because it makes people tell a story with photos. Sometimes, words aren’t necessary; as the famous saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. So although I added a few words to the following photos, the photos should tell enough of a story for you to see a day in my life. I suggest viewing the photos from left to right, and hovering your mouse over them for captions (all but 2 or 3 have captions). Enjoy.

04.02.2013 (with a couple thrown in from 04.03.2013 & 04.04.2013)

As usual, the system takes forever to load, so in the meantime...
As usual, the system takes forever to load, so in the meantime…

(Since I switched teams, though, I don’t conduct visits as much as I used to. That has its pros & cons.)

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So every once in a while, something like this is nice.  (Unlike many Britons, though, I rarely drink.)
So every once in a while, something like this is nice. (Unlike many Britons, though, I rarely drink.)

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I try breaking up my week (or weekends) to keep from going insane in this career field to keep myself a little grounded. For example:

So there you have it. Hopefully you’re not too bored with a day in my life. Until next time, thanks for reading.

Keep calm and drink tea.
Keep calm and drink tea.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Love.

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

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For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

P.S. Happy Valentine’s Day. Make sure you celebrate love in all of its forms, every day.

Neighbourhood love.
Neighbourhood love.
For love of country.
For love of country.
For love of country 2.
For love of country 2.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Illumination.

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.
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DTW airport – Detroit, Michigan, United States.

Between terminals - light at the end of the tunnel.
Between terminals – light at the end of the tunnel.

Related Weekly Photo Challenge link: http://quotidianhudsonriver.com/2013/01/15/1-15-13-weekly-photo-challenge-illumination

Weekly Photo Challenge: My 2012 in Pictures

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.
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This is just a small sample of my photos taken in 2012. Feel free to look at my archived Weekly Photo Challenge posts for more.

Shrove Tuesday.
Shrove Tuesday.
How splendid.
How splendid.
View from a doorway.
View from a doorway.
Chocolate vodka chillies.
Chocolate vodka chillies.
Bubacar playing the xylophone.
Bubacar playing the xylophone.
Tagus River & 25 de Abril Bridge (Ponte 25 de Abril), one of many views from the castle.
Tagus River & 25 de Abril Bridge (Ponte 25 de Abril), one of many views from the castle.

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Oh look. First thing in the morning.
Oh look. First thing in the morning.

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Grandma's essence.
Grandma’s essence.
Fruit stand.
Fruit stand.
Rush hour.
Rush hour.
Free (and purchased) goodies.
Free (and purchased) goodies.
Snail.
Snail.
Strata.
Strata.
Food. Glorious gluttonous food.
Food. Glorious gluttonous food.
Finished product.
Finished product.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Big.

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here. (Apologies for being late with this entry; better late than never.)

Rate this:

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

(Apologies for being late with this entry; better late than never.)

Strata.
Strata.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Happy.

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Rate this:

For more about how the Weekly Photo Challenge started, take a look at this link. For more about this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

Lectures. Because I'm a nerd. Kofi Annan (left), 10.07.2012.
Lectures. Because I’m a nerd. Kofi Annan (left), 10.07.2012.
Food. Glorious gluttonous food.
Food. Glorious gluttonous food.

Rock the vote.

Are you a U.S. expatriate who wants to vote in this year’s elections? If so, check out the following information sent to me about voting via absentee ballot.

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In transit.
In transit.

Are you a U.S. expatriate who wants to vote in this year’s elections? If so, check out the following information sent to me about voting via absentee ballot. For best accuracy, I’d suggest checking with your home state and your local embassy in your resident country for details, as it’s possible (I’m not sure, don’t wanna give out incorrect information) that different embassies in different countries have different instructions.
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Absentee ballots already delivered to overseas voters: Every U.S. citizen who requested an absentee ballot and selected the fax or email delivery option should have received it by now. Please cast your vote and take steps to return your completed ballot promptly so that your vote will count. See instructions below.

Returning your ballot by mail: Place your completed ballot in a U.S. postage-paid envelope containing the address of your local election officials. Place the completed ballot in a sealed envelope and take it to (my local embassy). We will send it back to the U.S. for you without the need to pay international postage. If it’s easier for you to use the (resident country) postal system, be sure to affix sufficient international postage, and allow adequate time for international mail delivery. If time is tight, you may want to use a private courier service (e.g., FedEx, UPS, or DHL) to meet your state’s ballot receipt deadline.

U.S. citizens can submit their completed ballots to the (resident country) Embassy’s Consular Section between the hours of (check yours locally), Monday through Friday, with the exception of (resident country) and U.S. holidays. No appointment is necessary. Please bring your ballot in a sealed envelope, and your U.S. passport. Your ballot will be sent to the United States via pouch, which takes approximately 10 working days.

Returning your ballot by email, fax, or upload: Some states allow these options, but may also require you to mail in the signed paper ballot. To find out more about your state’s specific requirements, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program website at www.FVAP.gov.

Haven’t received your ballot yet? Use the emergency write-in ballot: U.S. citizens who requested an absentee ballot but haven’t received it should go to www.FVAP.gov to complete a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot. Follow the above guidance for returning your ballot. If you later receive your regular absentee ballot, vote and return it immediately. Local election officials will count just one ballot per voter, and will use the regular ballot if received by your state’s ballot receipt deadline.

Forgot to register or request an absentee ballot? Act immediately! There are three options:

Option #1: Register and request a ballot today using the Federal Post Card Application form at www.FVAP.gov. Select the electronic ballot delivery option, include your email address (and fax number, if applicable) and send it to local election officials in your state. Almost every state lets you submit a ballot by email or fax. Once your application is processed they will send you your ballot via fax or email depending on your state. Vote as soon as you receive the blank ballot. Registration deadlines vary and some are as early as October 7, so check your state’s requirements carefully.

Option #2: Follow the instructions in Option #1, but also complete and send in a Federal Write-in Ballot at the same time to make sure your vote is counted. This option may be the best one for first-time voters if your state requires you to submit your Federal Post Card Application by mail. Vote and submit your regular absentee ballot if/when it arrives. Local election officials will count just one ballot per voter, and will use the regular ballot if it’s received by the ballot receipt deadline.

Option #3: Voters from the following states can use the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot as a combined voter registration form, absentee ballot request, and absentee ballot: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington. (NOTE: This form must reach your local election officials by your state’s absentee ballot request deadline or voter registration deadline, whichever is first.)

Returning your Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot by mail: Follow the guidance above for returning your ballot by mail.

Returning your Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot by email or fax: The following states allow voters to email or fax their signed, voted Federal Write-in Absentee Ballots back to local election officials: Arizona, California (fax only), Colorado, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. (NOTE: see instructions at http://www.FVAP.gov for faxing or emailing your voted ballot.)

Confirm your registration and ballot delivery online: Learn more at the Federal Voting Assistance Program’s (FVAP) website at www.FVAP.gov.